Shiplap can be a great way to add some character and beauty to the outside of your home. However, your decorative statement might not last long if you choose a soft wood that deteriorates quickly outdoors. Which wood should you use? Keep reading to find out what our readers recommend.
Melanie Musson

Melanie Musson

Melanie Musson is a home improvement expert with Clearsurance.com.

4 Types of Wood for Shiplap Siding + Bonus

1. Cedar is the best value for your money if you want to install shiplap siding on your house. Cedar is hard and incredibly durable. It will last far longer than vinyl siding as long as it’s properly cared for.

2. Reclaimed wood is another popular shiplap siding choice. If you can source it, reclaimed wood is already aged and ready to go.

3. Exotic hardwoods are excellent for durability and beauty, but they tend to be very expensive.

4. Pine is an adequate choice. It’s not as durable as cedar, but it’s probably the most inexpensive option. It’s a popular choice for people on a tight budget.

Bonus:
You can even use synthetic wood for shiplap siding. Even though it can look attractive, the artificial qualities make the finished product lose some of its charm.

Water Resistance for the Win

Cedarwood is the best material for shiplap siding because, among other woods commonly used, it is the most water-resistant. Other woods bulge and shrink when exposed to water, so water resistance is quite important, especially if the shiplap is used outdoors or in the bathroom. [Cedar wood] is more expensive than other types of wood, but the benefits outweigh its high price disadvantage.

Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson, Founder of Sawinery.
Jack Miller

Jack Miller

Jack Miller is the founder of How I Get Rid Of. He is a home improvement and pest control expert with more than 15 years of experience.

Wood That Can Hold up to Bad Weather

It’s best to go with salvaged hardwood. They’re proven to withstand even the harshest weather elements, and they’re cheaper, too. You can get these from your local lumberyard.

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