With so many different types of wood available today it can be difficult to tell them apart. Many homeowners often get reclaimed wood and beetle kill pine confused. Before getting into some of the differences and similarities of beetle kill pine vs reclaimed wood, lets take a moment to define these two types of lumber.

Reclaimed wood is lumber that has been salvaged from previously built houses, barns, schools, churches, libraries and other establishments. After it is removed from the site it is cleaned up and old nails and any other hardware is removed.

The most common reclaimed wood is made up of elm, chestnut, hickory, and pine. This is because in a forest environment these are the most available species of wood.

Beetle kill pine is lumber from lodgepole or ponderosa pine trees. Beetle kill pine is the result of millions of fallen trees that were infested by the mountain pine beetle. During the infestation the beetles leave behind a blue toned fungus which permanently colors the lumber. This fungus prevents the trees vascular system from working to carry water and nutrients throughout the tree causing it to die.

Similarities

Now, when we are talking about Colorado beetle kill pine and reclaimed lumber one of the most noteworthy similarities is both will be some species of pine. Colorado has an overabundance of pine trees throughout its forests.

Another similarity that causes confusion is that both reclaimed wood and beetle kill pine can be used as paneling.

Differences

One noteworthy difference between beetle kill pine and reclaimed wood is the price point. Since reclaimed wood is very popular right now and not as readily available as beetle kill pine is can be substantially more expensive.

Beetle kill pine is so abundant, and the mountain pine beetle continues to multiply so the price is consistently lower than most types of lumber.

Another way to keep beetle kill pine and reclaimed wood separate in your mind is that one is manufactured, and one is not. Beetle kill pine does go through a milling process. Reclaimed wood on the other hand goes straight from its original habitat into the hands of its purchaser. It is not milled and does not go through any other altering processes.

This difference causes a lot of concern among homeowners and often discourages them from using it. Since reclaimed wood has been exposed to decades even centuries of varying environments it can contain dangerous chemicals and even arsenic, lead, and creosote.

Beetle kill pine has not been exposed to such elements and is therefore one hundred percent safe to use.