The town of Boulder is full of history and historic buildings using Boulder lumber. The Boulder Valley was initially home to many Native American tribes. It was then settled by miners during the Gold Rush in 1858. Today, preserving Boulder lumber is a high priority for the Historic Boulder Society.

During this time the competition for land was fierce among settlers as the Boulder Valley was “the place to be”. With the history of the town dating this far back it is no wonder that the valley is full of historical buildings using Boulder lumber.

Today the Historic Boulder Society works to preserve each and every piece of Boulder lumber that is still standing. Because of the dense population many of the historic buildings using Boulder lumber have been threatened by demolition at one time or another.

The Historic Boulder Society proudly advocates for the buildings using Boulder lumber by creating historic districts, landmarking significant structures, and identifying sites for future preservation.

The Historic Boulder Society has successfully saved a multitude of old buildings using Boulder lumber.

Here are some of the buildings using Boulder lumber that you may be familiar with:

Harbeck-Bergheim House

For the past few decades the house has been leased by the Museum of Boulder. Now that the museum has moved to a new site some city council members felt that tearing sown the house using Boulder lumber would be the best the most viable option.

The Historic Boulder Society has been working with the city council to provide options for other organizations to lease the property which would bring in revenue and save the Boulder lumber.

Boulder Theater

The theater using Boulder lumber was shut down in the 1970’s when multiplex cinemas showed up. Standing empty the building went through a few renovations and many wanted to tear it down to build newer more functional buildings. The Historic Boulder Society put three conversation easements on the architecture and interior. The theater using Boulder lumber remains an icon of the town and will now forever be protected.

Jamestown Mercantile

This mercantile, using Boulder lumber, is the original building that once housed a market frequented by miners during the Gold Rush. Many people have wanted to tear down the building and construction hotels, office buildings, and other modern -day structures using Boulder lumber.

It has been deemed a historic site and has been revitalized. It is currently a restaurant and a popular one at that!

The University of Colorado Campus

There are various buildings and structures using Boulder Lumber on the university campus are in the historic registry. Many of them are in use by campus staff and organizations.

They have been threatened over time as the need for more classroom and facilities are needed but with the advocacy of the Historic Boulder Society they will remain part of the university.

Whether you are native to Colorado or not you should take the time to appreciate these historical places using Boulder lumber. Today the town is thought of as a “hippie” spot, but its origin runs much deeper!

Though you are unable to use some of this historic Boulder lumber for your own lumber projects, we here at Rocky Mountain Forest Products offer both true and faux reclaimed wood products! If you would like to hear about what lines of reclaimed we offer, give us a call!